Select Page
Fun, Fears & Finances frolicking fulltime for 18 months through Europe

Fun, Fears & Finances frolicking fulltime for 18 months through Europe

by Ruth Murdoch  |  January 2019  | Summary Blogs, Fun, Fears & Finances frolicking fulltime for 18 months through Europe

Introduction

Fun, Fears, & Finances, Frolicking Fulltime for 18 Months Through Europe is a look into the Motorhome Lifestyle from a couple of Kiwi travellers.  We hope that this account of our journey inspires you to visit some of the sights, attractions, and countries that we have had the pleasure of enjoying.  We are lucky that Alan’s Irish passport allows me, as his wife, free right of movement throughout Europe including the Schengen zone.

Throughout this blog when you see orange text that indicates more information.  To access this, just click on the coloured text and a new window will open and you can read further on that particular subject.

Number of Countries and Capital Cities

We’ve visited 23 countries in 18 months, 14 of these included visiting the capital city. Here’s an alphabetical list of those countries.

Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Russia, San Marino, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and lastly the Vatican City.

Capital Cities included Tirana, Andorra la Vella, Vienna, Zagreb, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Paris, Athens, Rome, Amsterdam, Oslo, San Marino, Stockholm, and again the Vatican City.

Below is the map of our 281 stopping points over the past 18 months.  To look at photos or receive the GPS coordinates, just click on the marker.  The different colours are for the different years, 2017 in blue and 2018 in red.

Biggest Country

Russia (although we only visited St Petersburg and then by ferry, leaving Betsy behind in Helsinki). Russia’s size is 3,972,400 sq km making this the latest country, not just in Europe, but in the world, with a population of 144.5M!

The Winter Palace, aka The Hermitage Palace, St Petersburg, Russia

Smallest Country

The Vatican City is the smallest country in Europe (as well as the world) with 110 acres or 0.44km2, which lies within the city of Rome and has just 840 residents.

The Stunning Ceiling Inside the Vatican Museum, Vatican City

Scariest Moment

Without a doubt it has to be the snowstorm we found ourselves in while driving through the mountains of Norway.  We were enjoying glorious sunshine in the morning, but by later that day it all turned to custard (or snow, actually).  To share our horror and relief when we escaped, have a read of our blog here.

Betsy in the Norwegian Snow

Top Spots

We had to shy away from picking just one top spot because there are so many interesting, beautiful and varied places to see throughout Europe. Choosing just four still seems limiting but more realistic, so here goes. The top four spots of Europe (according to Ruth based on what we have seen so far)

#1       St Petersburg – for the architecture, food, and unique culture.

#2       Istanbul – for the vibrancy and interesting city life, the friendliest people ever, and the unique buildings, eg mosques.

#3       Norway – for the simply stunning scenery, which of course includes viewing of the Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights).

#4       Greece, nice feeling of freedom, great history, diverse culture and stunning landscapes.

Architecture in St Petersburg

Mosque of Istanbul

The Reflective Waters of Engan, Norway 

Delphi Ruins, Greece 

Museums

We have visited umpteen museums as you do when travelling and at one point I am ashamed to say that I felt a bit ‘museumed’ out. (Is that even a word?) However there have been some very interesting finds along the way.  Here’s my pick:

#1 Vasa Museum in Stockholm, Sweden.  This museum has just one ship, the Vasa, which was built in the 17th century and had a short life at sea of about 20 minutes before she sank.  She wasn’t re-discovered until the 1950’s and was raised in the 1960’s.  If you are interested in anything with a nautical theme, then this is worth a read and if you ever find yourself in Stockholm don’t miss out on seeing this incredible sight for yourself.

#2 Nobel Museum in Stockholm.  Just a small museum but packed with the stories and memorabilia of lots of interesting people including ex President Obama and of course Malala Yousafzai, two of the recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize.  What is interesting, of course, is that Obama was awarded this prize and then later as President of the United States, he declared war.  He offered to give his prize back but this was refused.

#3 ABBA from Sweden, again in Stockholm. This was nostalgic because it’s music I grew up with and felt I knew these singers pretty well.  The museum is about them all individually, their life, how they came together, their successful music career and their life struggles.  It’s a very real and moving account and worthy of a visit.

Stockholm was the city of museums, as you can see above. There are fifty-three museums in Stockholm alone!

Here’s some others of note that we visited:

#4 The Holocaust Museum in Norway provides a real sense of true stories from wartime and
#5 The Renaissance Museum in Oslo also is worthy of visiting.

ABBA Museum

Vasa Museum

Nobel Museum

Cathedrals

I could probably write an entire book on Churches and Cathedrals of Europe alone, and may do this one day.  You would think that once you’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.  That is not the case and I strongly urge anyone travelling through Europe to pop your head into any church or cathedral as you pass, there are some real gems out there.

#1 Monreale is my pick of the most beautiful church.  It’s situated just on the outskirts of Palermo, Sicily, Italy and really must be seen to be believed.  The time, effort, expense, and creativity of this church left us speechless.  It is one of those places where no matter how many photos you see, they can’t do this justice.  If you are in the area please don’t miss the opportunity to be wowed.

#2 Milan Cathedral – from the outside this cathedral is stunning, but head inside and it continues in that vein.  This church took 600 years to build, possibly by several generations who dedicated their life work to this beautiful building.

#3 Erice – There are several cathedrals and churches in Erice and all are worthy of a visit. For more information here’s our blog.

#4 The Sanctuary of Vicoforte in Northern Italy is worthy of a mention and a wee look too.

Cathedrals To Wow You

Wild Camping Number of Nights

In the past six months, we have used camping grounds 15 nights (8% of the total nights), camper parking 5 nights (3% of the total), and 162 nights free camping which represents 89% of our sleeping places. 

Over the past 18 months (547 nights) we have stayed at 281 different stopping point, and of these 49 (9%) were at camping grounds, 54 at camper parking (10%) and 444 or 81% were FREE camping, thanks primarily to Park4Night.

The only reason we stayed at camping grounds typically is due to family or friends, country regulations (Croatia), safety (Turkey), and requiring EHU (electrical hook up) for electricity (Norway).

 

We have been fortunate to encounter no problems during our free camping and in fact we have a routine that we follow to ensure the maximum safety for us and Betsy.  If you want to know our method then read our blog on how to safely and successfully wild camp by clicking here.

 


Costs

When analysing the costs over the past six months I looked back on the previous twelve month period to see how we compared. Given we travelled from July to November 2018 in the Scandinavian countries, including seven weeks in the notoriously expensive country of Norway, I was expecting the costs to be somewhat significantly higher. What I found instead was that the past six months came in just marginally higher on a per week basis, ie €403 per week, compared with €394 per week in the previous twelve month period.  It may have helped that we did stock up on groceries, wine and beer in Germany before heading further north, something I highly recommend if you are heading into Scandinavia.

For an entire account including a breakdown of our costs over the past 18 months, click here.

Motorhome Running Costs (aka Betsy juice)

For all you petrol heads out there (or should that be diesel heads?) who want to know about Betsy’s juice, here’s the stats showing the number of kilometres travelled and how thirsty our girl is.  Alan’s even included miles per gallon for the English folk reading this.

Betsy is built on a Renault Master base and sports a 2.3 litre 130bhp diesel engine.  We think that getting close to 27 mpg dragging 3.5 tonnes around Europe isn’t too bad.  If you want to see more about Betsy, how we came to have her, and all the extra bits that make her a wee bit special, then click here.

Like every proud parent, we think our girl is rather special.  Nice to have that external validation when Betsy’s photo was chosen to adorn the Inspired Campers Calendar for 2019.

Best Gadgets for Motorhomes

As times goes by, there are more things we discover we ‘need’ to make life easier.  One of these has been a window vacuum for the condensation issues from the colder countries.  This has become Alan’s all-time favourite gadget.

Next, I’d like to introduce you to Jenni.  She is my best friend and has saved us quite a bit of money on camping grounds and saved Alan stressful periods glued to the battery readout. (Ladies, do your husbands do this too?)

You see, we discovered that in Norway the sun hardly rises above the horizon in the autumn time which means it doesn’t get high enough to effectively charge the batteries from our solar panels.  Therefore, it doesn’t take long before this power hungry couple runs out of power.  We knew that our batteries were not holding charge as they should and looked at replacing them with AGM batteries.  AGM’s can be discharged more without damaging them which would effectively give us more usable power between charges.  A Norwegian chap we met was going to sell us some top-of-line Exide AGM batteries at a really great price, however they were bigger than the current batteries and just wouldn’t fit.  Instead, we opted to buy a small compact generator and now have as much power as we need.  This one is actually relatively quiet and we use it sparingly and considerately so as to minimise any disturbance to others.  Alan wrote a review of Jenni here.

We love to cook, hence our name Travel Cook Eat, and without an oven, cooking a variety of foods becomes challenging.  Therefore we purchased an Omnia oven, which you’ve probably heard us talk about before, but now there’s a review of this baby and you can read all about it here.  Or if you are in need of some inspiration or would just like some new recipes, please see some of our favourites here.

We have recently invested in the Tyrepal TPMS (Tyre Pressure Monitoring System), which has individual sensors on each wheel sending the tyre pressures to a small display on the dashboard.  This will alert us if any of our tyres develop a leak, which is important because we don’t carry a spare wheel.

Generator

Omnia Oven

Window Vac

Saddest Place

Without a doubt this would have to be the little French village of Oradour-Sur-Glane. On 10 June 1944 the German SS stormed the village and rounded up and killed all those people who lived here before burning the buildings.  The village remains standing as it was left back in 1944 as a sobering and constant reminder of war and what happened.  For more information, I highly recommend a read of our blog and if you are in the region make this a ‘must visit’.

Main Street Burnt Out; Forever A Memorial

Town of Oradour-Sur-Glane

Biggest Lesson

History is everywhere you look in Europe, and this is especially apparent to us when we reflect on how young New Zealand is.  November 11 2018 signified the 100 year anniversary of the end of World War One.  Throughout Belgium and France we visited many of the WWI sites and paid our respects to the thousands, actually no make that millions, of young men who lost their lives fighting for our freedom today.  What really struck me was that each white cross or headstone not only represented one person who never made it home, but the family and friends behind that person.  I really struggled when thinking about the ripple affect each death had and how a generation of men were wiped from the world, forever!

At school I didn’t take history as a subject, however actually being here and seeing the places that history talks about has changed my perspective.  So I’ve devoured as much information as I can to finally learn what really happened, thereby coming to realise that history is an important subject. Better late than never, eh?

Thousands of Remembrance Poppies

Special Moments

#1 When staying with Paul in the Netherlands we went for a cycle to an oyster processor and scoffed oysters and chardonnay in the late summer sun overlooking the two varieties of oysters that were being cleaned and prepared for sale. The reason this was so special is that Oysters and Chardonnay are two of my favourites.

#2 We paid homage to those fallen soldiers of the First World War at a ceremony of the Last Post played nighly at the Menin Gate in Ypres, Belgium.  This tradition started on 1st July 1928 and apart from one exception (during the German occupation of Belgium in the Second World War), the bugles have sounded every night since at precisely 8.00pm local time.  It was November, so we stood, wrapped up warmly against the bitter cold, with about two hundred others waiting in anticipation of what was to come.  In complete silence we witnessed four buglers and one bagpiper carrying on this unique tradition.

#3 Not long before heading to Europe I was told about my great uncle Bert from the small town of Te Aroha, who came to fight in WWI alongside his brother. Sadly Bert didn’t make it home and we visited his memorial where his name is engraved on the New Zealand Memorial wall at Buttes New British Cemetery outside Zonnebecke.  Sadly his body was never recovered so he doesn’t have a grave.

Fresh Delicious Oysters in Yerseke with Paul

Stunning Reflection of Menin Gates, Ypres

Buttes New British Cemetery

Fun Times

Everyone said it was easy to catch fish in Norway, so being keen fisherpeople we decided to give it a go. We headed out on a small boat and learnt how to use the traditional hand lines.  Alan caught the first fish, followed by me catching a small coalfish, before I then showed the skipper how to fish NZ style and caught a large (>10kg) fish by hooking it in the tail! That filled our freezer with about 16 meals of fresh fish and required me to be creative on recipes to try.

This time, Alan couldn’t claim his baiting skills were responsible for me catching a bigger fish than him, because we didn’t use bait!

Alan’s Fish

Ruth’s Fish

Unusual Local Foods Eaten

Horse – in Italy (dried). It tastes like any other red meat that’s dried, like beef jerky.

Reindeer in Finland. While in Lapland we partook in Reindeer cooked three different ways.  Sauteed and simmered with sliced Reindeer roast, lingonberries, pickled cucumber and buttery mashed potatoes.  Then sliced Reindeer sirloin, and slow-cooked Reindeer neck with creamy juniper berry sauce, cranberry jelly, local root vegetables and game potatoes breaded with rye.  Dining in a restaurant allows one to taste this meat cooked properly, and our preferred option was by far slow-cooked.  While it might sound unusual, the meat was lovely and there was nothing I could think to relate it to, or how to describe the taste.

Elk in Norway at a truck stop.  Not exactly the place you expect to try exotic meats, but there you have it and it was tasty enough, served with cranberry sauce,  boiled whole potatoes and crunchy vegetables.  Alan’s meal was another traditional treat, bacon with a creamy cabbage and potato mix.  Wasn’t really my cuppa tea but it was tasty enough.  We can’t remember the name, so if you know it, please send us a message below.  Thanks.

Wild Moose in Sweden while staying with friends.  The Swedish Government allows one moose and one calf to be shot per year per 1,000 hectares in order to regulate the numbers.  For our friends who cooked and served us the Moose they have a group of ten shooters and they share the meat between the group. Otherwise, the moose become pests to the farmers.  It tastes similar to beef.

Don’t freak out when I tell you about the most unusual food we tried in Norway.  I am already feeling a little defensive when writing this but stay with me.  The meat, again tried in a restaurant, was Whale!  I know, I know, it sounds like I’m supporting an industry that is reviled around the world.  However, keep reading for more education about this dish before judging.

The whale was served lightly fried (meaning almost raw) with mushroom stew (aka sauce), fried vegetables, red onions and potatoes.  My first impression of whale meat was that it reminded me of liver.  Then I felt the meat was rather dry, and then it had a gamey taste. By the end it was just like eating steak. No fishy flavour whatsoever, obviously. The restaurant cooked it extremely rare and it had sinew or veins running through the meat, but it wasn’t really chewy.

I wouldn’t go out of my way to eat it again and by comparison, Elk and Reindeer were much tastier.  Overall I was happy to experience just once in my lifetime.

Now here’s the thing about eating whale in Norway.  The Minke Whale, which is native to Norwegian waters, is not endangered, the catch is very strictly regulated and the is 100% sustainable.  The industry is far smaller than historical levels, largely due to the relatively low demand but whaling seems more a cultural thing for the people than just a source of protein. 

The Norwegian Government recently ran a promotion of whale meat as a fine dining experience.  It was a complete failure.  Younger, environmentally conscious people struggled with the whale meat concept and now all government funding has ceased.  It will gradually die out over time.

A local ex-fisherman we spoke with said the economics of whaling are poor, people have stopped eating the meat and therefore less and less people are fishing them.  He also told us about the problem that the large whale numbers were causing to the declining small fish stocks.

Reindeer Sirloin

Reindeer Slow Cooked

Elk Steak

Pork and Cabbage Delight

Tasty Homemade Moose Loaf

Whale Steak

What Took Our Breath Away

Without a doubt it would have to be the Aurora Borealis, aka Northern Lights and also a unique sunset that is only possible to see in Finland during two or three days per year.  We, in fact, also witnessed the Aurora Borealis in Finland before reaching Norway, however the Norwegian light display was ten times more powerful and spectacular.  For a detailed account, plus to find out what time of the year we saw them, read our blog on the Aurora Borealis.

Most Beautiful Scenery

The Åland Islands. This archipelago of 6,500 named and 20,000 unnamed islands lies between Sweden and Norway and island hopping across them was a fun and enjoyable alternative to taking a direct ferry for Stockholm to Turku.  We spent an idyllic 12 days there in total. The scenery was lovely, the weather warm, and given their three-week summer peak period had finished, it was lovely and quiet.

We couldn’t go past the simply sublime scenery of Norway.  Not only were we blessed with fine weather, we had the autumn colours and a sprinkling of snow on the mountains.  Take a look at some of our favourite scenery photos.

Calm Waters of The Åland Islands

Kumlinge Island Boathouse

Original Farm Buildings

Norway, Spectacular Countryside

Videos

Sometimes the best way to show the beauty of a country is with video.  Take a look at these two videos of the stunning scenery in Norway and let us know what you think.

People We’ve Met

One can’t help but meet people along the journey and we consider ourselves very fortunate to meet some of the loveliest travellers around.  Some of them have even invited us to stay with them as we passed through their home countries on our travels.   Let me introduce you to the people we’ve met.  The place name in the box is where we met for the first time.

If we’ve met you and you can’t find your photo here, please email me at [email protected] and include details of where we met and a photo. Thanks.

Hover over the text for the right arrow to appear, then scroll through to see our friends.  These appear in the order we met people.

Vojo & Susi

We met Vojo (Croatia) & Susi (Switzerland) in Arenzano, Italy.  They were the first ‘other’ motorhomers we met and interestingly enough they didn’t speak any English but thanks to Google Translate we managed to communicate.

Mr & Mrs Emichetti & Ettore

I first met Ettore in New Zealand many years ago and had the pleasure of meeting his parents in 2017 & 18.  His mother was concerned we didn’t eat enough – her cooking was superb!

The Family

The great thing about being in this part of the world is getting to see family. Here Carrie (Alan’s sister from the UK) and his Mum Jan (NZ) came for a visit and to meet Betsy.

Jan & Marja

This couple are bad news! Especially when it comes to lavishing us with food and alcohol.  We had two ‘filling’ visits with them and their children in Holland, they took us around their countryside and introduced us to many yummy foods, including bitterballs and fricadelles.

Pip & Ross

Love having friends join us for a wee sail around the Greek Islands.  I used to sail with Ross & Pip in NZ and now they live in the UK it just made sense to hire a yacht in a gorgeous location.

Spyros

Like a Knight in Shining Armour, Spyros helped us tie up the yacht in a fresh breeze on Skopelos Island. We were indebted to him. We then met up again in Volos where Sypros played tour guide sharing the beauty of the surrounding mountains.

Paul

Paul (lives in Holland and is from Belgium) kindly opened up his home to us for a few nights.  We shared a special time together, in particular cycling to the oyster farm and tasting the oysters with Chardonnay.  Paul is an uber-talented photographer, pity his skills didn’t rub off on me when taking this photo.

Detlef

Originally from Germany, but living in Turkey, we met Detlef in Greece.  He’s working with local government to install campervan stops in their towns and increase tourism.  Detlef is very knowledgable about most things, including the politics of Turkey and Germany.

Mesut

Mesut is the owner of the Boomerang Cafe in Eceabat, not far from Gallipoli.  If you are in the area stop by and have a drink with him.  He has memorabilia from Australia and NZ, although not enough from NZ, hence the tea towel we gave him taking pride of place in the middle of his cafe.

Naciye

Mrs Savas is the mother of the owner from Troia Pension & Camping where we stayed in Canakkale, Turkey.  She taught us how to make Gozleme’s, Turkish Style. Yummy.

The Chef

Affectionately known as ‘The Chef’ by everyone around him, this chap has a huge heart for people.  He ran the Yanecapi Sports Centre in Istanbul where we hung out for four weeks and he would often invite us over for a meal.

Tommy & Zoe

We first met this cool couple, Tommy & Zoe, in Istanbul, Turkey in November 2017, then again recently in Spain.  Tommy is from Ireland and Zoe from the  Canarias Islands.  Here we are celebrating Tommy’s birthday with a shop bought delicious and well-decorated cake.

Pinar

One of the best experiences we’ve had was at Turkish Cookin, a class with just Alan and I in attendance.  We laughed, ate, drank, and enjoyed the evening. If you ever get a chance and want to experience something fun, then I can definitely recommend this.  Or to try some of the recipes visit our website.

Dan & Cornelia

We first met these guys in December 2017 travelling with their lovely family from Romania in Alexandroupolis, Greece and then again in Crete.

Vaggelis

Vaggelis showed Alan how to fish in the Greek waters of Nea Peramos in December 2018.  Afterwards, he took us and the fish to the local nearby Taverna where it was cooked and served to us, yum.

Jordan and Alex

Our first meeting was in Greece in December 2017 and I had to laugh when they were running around outside their motorhome in the snow!  That’s Aussie’s for ya. We caught up again in Amsterdam where Alex has landed herself a pretty cool job.

Dorel, Oana, Ciprian & Irina

This photo was taken while celebrating Christmas lunch 2017 in a Greece restaurant in Thessaloniki.  The four people named above are from Romania who we met up with again in Athens around New Years Eve 2017.

Romanian Family

A friendly family who we met beside a hot spring called Thermopylae.

 

Mitch & Sue

We shared a couple of dinners with this lovely couple, from the UK, in Pylos and rode out a pretty terrific storm together on the pier.

Katherine & James

We had a pot luck dinner together in the van of Katherine & James (UK) and also rode out the storm in Pylos.

Helena & Harkin

Kind-hearted and excellent tour guides are just a few of this couple’s attributes.  Having met them in Pylos, Greece (riding out a storm together with others), we were invited to stay with them in Sweden and did so, not only once, but twice.  They kindly played tour-guide and showed us their beautiful part of the country, including a ride out on their boat to a swimming spot.  Louisa, their little dog, is such a delight and also greeted us warmly.

Michelle & Tim

We met Michelle and her partner Tim (from the UK) in January 2018 at Camping Thines camping ground in Greece.  Michelle is the life of the party as you can see here by her dancing style.

Ulla & Bodo

Silicy, Italy was the original meeting place of this fun couple.  We hit it off straight away (the wine helped) and soon were invited for dinner.  It was our pleasure to stay with them in Germany where we were treated as royalty to their wonderful cooking and tourist hosts.  I even attended Italian lessons with Ulla.

The Family Again!

A little cooler this time, but again a wonderful visit in Holland with Carrie (UK) and Jan (NZ).

Monica

We first met Monica online through Facebook and then met both Monica and her partner Chris (from the UK) in person in Denmark. They came for a quick cuppa then stayed for dinner and parked up overnight. Here’s Monica’s first attempt at an eBike.

Lisbeth, Christian, Mikkel & Bertram

Lisbeth is my oldest friend (since 15 years old) and it was wonderful meeting her family again in Denmark where I celebrated and was spoilt on my birthday in July 2018.  We then went camping together for a week in Skagen.

Mette & Polle

I’ve known Mette since I was 20 years, and it was great meeting her husband Polle for the first time (and she got to meet my husband, Alan).

Vladimir

Vladimir was our friendly guide in St Petersburg, Russia.  He was uber knowledgable about his city and gave us an insight into what it was like growing up in the Soviet regime.  If you need a guide I’d be happy to connect you.

Jan

Jan took us out on his fishing boat in Moskenes, the Lofoten Islands, Norway where Ruth caught a large Coal fish.

Grethe & Villy

The parents of my oldest friend, Lisbeth, whom I first meet in Denmark in 1996.  We enjoyed a lovely evening catching up again. I love that the Danish speak such great English. X

Wilbert

Wilbert is responsible for part of my education (NLP Master Practitioner) when we met in Perth, Western Australia.  Lovely to see him again in Holland and share a meal together.

Wilfried & Lisbeth

The very talented Wilfried (artist) and Lisbeth (people person) graced us with their fun, laughter, and project (www.face-europe.eu). Here Wilfried is painting Alan while Lisbeth interviews him about his life.  If you want to be part of this project, please contact them through their website above.

Click here to read about our first six months (including newbie mistakes we laugh about now) and our One Year of Wilding Living.

Please feel free to share this widely or Pin for Later.

If you’ve enjoyed reading this post, please leave a comment and share with others.

Or Pin yourself for later.

Oradour-sur-Glane, Why Everyone Should Know This Story

Oradour-sur-Glane, Why Everyone Should Know This Story

by Ruth Murdoch  |  December 2018  | France, Oradour-sur-Glane

Where Is It?

Oradour-sur-Glane is a small settlement in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in west-central France.  It is 23kms northwest from Limoges.

What Happened There?

During World War II, two hundred Waffen SS (pronounced Vaffen SS) the armed wing of the Nazi Party’s SS organisation committed an act of sheer terror.  They stormed this quiet village and massacred all those people they could find, a total of 642 men, women and children.

They rounded everyone up on the pretence of checking their documentation, a relatively common occurrence.  Therefore, at the time no one seemed overly concerned as they had no reason to suspect what was about to unfold.  They were forced by the officers to the town square (although it’s not a square at all).  Anyone who resisted was immediately shot dead.

The area to the right is where everyone assembled

They then separated the men and teenage boys from the woman and children.  The men were divided and sent to six different buildings* throughout the village.  In one of the buildings the perpetrators lined up two machine guns in the doorway and proceeded to open fire in a sweeping motion while the men stood facing the back wall.  For anyone who hadn’t died instantly, they then received another bullet to finish the job off.  Similar fates befell the men in the other buildings.  The soldiers were instructed to cover the bodies with straw and oil and burn them.

The women and children were taken to the local church.  Here they were locked in and smoke bombs were set off inside the church.  While the woman and children were screaming and gasping from the thick smoke, some of the SS fired into the mass with machine guns.  The bullet holes in the walls remain today.  The church was then set alight while the soldiers stood outside listening to the screams of those inside and from their position of safety threw grenades into the building.  They waited there watching until the roof of the church collapsed and the sounds inside died away.

NB: *There are many blogs, posts, and stories written that talk about these men being taken to ‘barns’.  When I think about a barn it conjures up in my mind a single building on a farm that houses hay, farm equipment, some chickens and the occasional cattle.  Here in Oradour-sur-Glane the buildings that we saw these men taken into were flanked by adjoining buildings either side on a main street.  Perhaps we have a different understanding of what the word ‘barn’ means to those from France.  Anyway, I cannot accurately recall the information from the museum about where these men were taken, so if anyone can shed some knowledgable light on this, please feel free to leave a comment below and I will ensure this post is updated with accurate information.  I didn’t feel it was correct to put the word ‘barn’ into this post without verification.

Inside the Church a Memorial of WWI Victims Bears The Scars Of Bullet Holes Meant For
The Women & Children

The Church Ceiling Collapsed
Courtesy of Museum Photos

The Church Today

After everyone was dead, the soldiers then set fire to the bodies in an apparent effort to conceal what had happened.  They also put the entire village to the torch and although the buildings are made of stone, the roofs and large parts of the walls collapsed in the ensuing inferno.

Photo Courtesy of the SS

A Tribute To Those Who Perished In The Church 

The following day orders were received to bury the bodies and bits of bodies in a mass grave making identification impossible.  Fewer than ten percent of the victims’ bodies could be identified which made the mourning that much harder for any surviving relatives.

Sadly this was not an isolated incident.  According to the International Military Tribunal all the Nazi armed forces including the Waffen SS, security forces and SS police, reserve troops and the Wehrmacht followed orders involving killing and terrorising civilians, which were later deemed to be war crimes.  There were many horrific events of mass murder documented on both the Western and Eastern Fronts.   What makes Oradour-sur-Glane unique is that the remains of the village have been left virtually undisturbed as a continuous and powerful reminder of how brutal and callous mankind can be to each other.

About The Population

Of the 642 victims, 638 had known ages.  Amongst the deceased were 62 children less than 6 months old and 263 less than 21 years.  Thirty-nine people were aged over 71 years old, eight of these were 81 years plus, with the balance of 340 people aged between 21 and 70 years.

On 10th June 2017, a tribute to those people who were murdered was unveiled.  The purpose behind this gallery is to think of these people as individuals, rather than as a collective group.

The individual portraits, where possible, are displayed on porcelain plaques lining both walls on the corridor as you enter through to the village.  Where photos are missing a name and age is written in the ever-hopeful attempt to find those from absent victims.

Individuals’ Photos Line The Corridor Leading Out To The Village

When Did This Happen?

It was Saturday, 10th June 1944.  Oradour-sur-Glane was especially busy on this day as there was a school vaccination program for the children being carried out here.  Tobacco distribution day also bought people in from the surrounding areas.

 

Why Did It Happen?

Terror was an effective weapon used by the Germans and the Nazis wanted to ensure that this weapon be used on a regular basis.  Encouraged by the recent D-Day landings, the French resistance had taken control of the areas to the west and east of Oradour-sur-Glane, however this village had little resistance activity and effectively became a sitting duck for the SS.

It appears that the events at Oradour-sur-Glane were intended to demonstrate to the population that terror could happen anywhere, anytime and that attempts to disrupt the German war effort would be severely punished.

There were no specific reason given as to exactly why the village was selected or why it was so completely and ruthlessly annihilated, despite several urban myths and earlier theories arising in the following years.

Click on the middle right-hand side of the picture to show more or wait for the slideshow

Urban Myths Put To Rest

Was Oradour-sur-Glane a case of mistaken identity like many claim?  There are rumours saying that the real town the SS were looking for was in fact Oradour-sur-Vayres.  However, that’s all it was, a rumour.  According to the audio commentary at the museum, this fact was never substantiated.  On the contrary, it has been proven that there was no case of mistaken identity after all.

Another myth concerned the reason for the attack which suggested that it was in retaliation for the capture of an SS officer by the resistance (even Wikipedia states this).  However again new information has now put this one to rest.  Yes, there were two incidents of captured SS officers immediately preceding the event, however, one of the men (and his driver) escaped and fled to the nearby town of Limoges, to arrive during the morning of Saturday 10th June.  A second SS officer was captured in the general area and moved to a secret location, however at the time of the incident these two events were unlinked.  The SS themselves used the disappearance of their Officer as later justification for the Oradour massacre.

A third story tells of how the SS shot the men below the knees to prevent them from escaping.  However, the orders of the SS were to kill everyone, so there was no need for inflicting incapacitating injuries and the information at the museum suggests that the SS shot to kill and finished off the survivors before incinerating the bodies.  There was no specific account of wounding, according to official sources that I have been able to verify in the research, despite seeing this recorded in numerous places and blogs.

An entire family killed

Look at the name Thomas, so many family members gone!

They Were Just Children!

The New Town Rebuilt

On 10th June 1947 President Vincent Auriol presided over the ceremony of laying the “foundation stone” of the new village of Oradour-sur-Glane.  The new town, which took over six years to build, was an exact replica of the old town, except that there was no train station.  The new town sadly entered into a period of mourning that was to last for decades.

The extended mourning period was due in part to the fact that the SS burnt many of the bodies beyond recognition making identification near impossible for grieving relatives from outside Oradour.  Additionally, the fact that no-one was brought to any kind of justice for committing these atrocities helped to fuel the mourning.  It wasn’t until the 1980’s when a new generation inhabited this town did the mourning period officially end.

 

The Silent Treatment

In the Bordeaux War Crime Trials after the war, the relatives and survivors of Oradour-sur-Glane sought justice and expected that those responsible would be tried, sentenced and punished appropriately.  However, the majority of the soldiers, officers and commanders were now dead and many others were in East Germany who refused to extradite them.  Eventually, after eight and a half years, 21 men were brought before the tribunal, found guilty and sentenced to prison.

However, this wasn’t the end of the story due to fourteen of the soldiers being Frenchmen from the province of Alsace, which had been annexed by German at the start of the war.  These soldiers had been forcibly conscripted, e.g. against their will, into the German army and an amnesty on 20th February 1953 freed all such forced conscriptees.  This action so disgusted the locals that politicians, local authorities and local state representatives were not invited to ceremonies organised by the National Association of Victims’ Families and the local council of Oradour-sur-Glane.  All other convicted soldiers were eventually released by 1958.

What isn’t clear from the information made available in the museum is what happened to the six people, one woman and five men who escaped this massacre.  I wonder why none of these people took part in the trial.

Memorial in Cemetery

Children’s Items

Memorial in the New Town

The 1983 Trial In The German Democratic Republic

Lt. Heinz Barth was in command of the 3rd Company of 1st Battalion Der Fuhrer Regiment.  It was thought that all trace of him was lost.  Could it have been that he was wounded and escaped capture by Allied forces?  Accused of taking part in the Oradour-sur-Glane massacre, he was condemned in absentia by the Bordeaux military tribunal in 1953.  Later reintegrated into civilian life in East Germany, in the former zone of Soviet occupation, Barth was ‘traced’ in 1982 and put on trial in East Berlin.  Barth did not deny his involvement but claimed to remember almost nothing.

Being the only SS member involved in the Oradour massacre to have been judged, the trial seemed to be a bit of a sham showing the protection given to former SS officers on the eastern side of the Iron Curtain.

The outcome of the trial was not recorded, however further research suggested he was sentenced to prison and released in 1997.  He died in 2007 at the age of 87.

The Children of Oradour-sur-Glane

Access To The Old Village

The only way into the old village during operational dates is through the superb architecturally designed building that houses the museum, which opened in 1999.  There is disability access to the old town via a lift and the town itself was built on relatively flat land making it easy to get around.  See Opening Times below for more information about access in winter.

Costs

Free entry to the Martyr Village (the name they now give this village).

Entry to the museum including two audio units cost us €19.60.  If you only speak English then it is highly recommended you make the most of the audio guide.  There is a short twelve-minute movie at the end of the museum and the audio provides extensive information not available elsewhere.

It was also thanks to the audio guide that we were able to obtain the answers regarding some of the misconceptions around this event as highlighted earlier.

My only criticism was the lack of closure on certain things.  Apparently, six adults escaped, plus one young boy.  Only one of the women who escaped from the church survived being shot, the other two perished.  There are no accounts for what became of these survivors.  Did they stay in the area, did they ever return, did they go on to live a long life?  It would have been great to have this detail filled in, as I guess we all want to cling onto some happy ending if that was even possible.  Perhaps it wasn’t.

 

Opening Times

From February 1st to 28th February: 9am5pm

From March 1st to 15th May: 9am6pm

From 16th May to 15th September: 9am to 7pm

From 16th September to 31st October: 9am to 6pm

From November 1st to 15th December: 9am5pm

Admittance is up until one hour before closing time.  Believe me, you will want to spend more than an hour here if it is your goal to try to comprehend what went on and to contemplate the many ruined buildings and relics of the lost civilisation here.

Annual closure of the Centre de la Mémoire is from 16th December to 31st January inclusive. During this closed period, the ruins are still accessible between 09:00 to 17:00 via the entrance on the road to Confolens (the D9) opposite the Centre de la Mémoire. The ruins can also be accessed during the dates when the Centre is closed, via the original entrance at the Northern and the Southern ends of the village.

Parking Nearby For Motorhomes

We stayed two nights here, on the first night we parked in the carpark overlooking the old town.  This gave easy and close walking access to the old town.  I’m not sure how busy this place becomes in the height of summer, however there is also an Aire situated 1.3kms further north past the new town.  Here you can find electricity and in the summer months water for a small fee.

Spread The Word

Please help to spread the word about the events of Oradour-sur-Glane by sharing this blog far and wide.  A brief Facebook post reached over 15,500 people in one week and many people had no knowledge of the town or what took place.  That, in my humble opinion, is a real shame.  I believe everyone should know some of the atrocities of war.

If you wish to read further, here’s an excellent link for more information https://www.oradour.info/

Please PIN this far and wide